Tentative Program

Here is a draft of the program. This schedule is still subject to change; please check your time and room again once the final program is available.

Please search this document for your name or title to find out your presentation schedule. If you have any errors or schedule conflicts, please contact sslw@asu.edu by June 10, 2018.

Papers are 30-minute presentations (including time for setting up, presenting, and taking questions). Roundtables are shorter, 20-minute presentations. Colloquia are usually 90-minute sessions consisting of several presentations on related topics.

Schedule at a Glance

Thursday, August 2 (Day 1)
  08:15-09:45 Session A  
09:45-10:10 Coffee  
10:10-11:40 Session B  
11:40-12:45 Lunch Break  
12:45-13:00 Opening Remarks  
13:00-14:00 Plenary 1: Paul Kei Matsuda  
14:00-14:10 Break  
14:10-15:40 Session C  
15:40-16:00 Coffee  
16:00-17:30 Session D  
18:00-19:30 Reception  
Friday, August 3 (Day 2)
  08:15-09:15 Plenary 2: Ryuko Kubota  
09:15-09:40 Coffee  
09:40-10:40 Session E  
10:40-10:50 Break  
10:50-11:50 Session F  
11:50-12:50 Lunch Break  
12:50-14:20 Session G  
14:20-14:45 Coffee  
14:45-16:15 Session H  
16:15-16:30 Break  
16:30-17:30 Plenary 3: Steve Marshall  
Saturday, August 4 (Day 3)
  08:15-09:45 Session I  
09:45-10:10 Coffee  
10:10-11:40 Session J  
11:40-12:40 Lunch Break  
12:40-13:40 Plenary 4: Guangwei Hu  
13:40-13:45 Break  
13:45-15:15 Session K  
15:15-15:45 Coffee  
15:45-16:45 Session L  
16:45-16:55 Break  
16:55-17:30 Closing and SSLW 2019 Preview  

Thursday, August 2, 2018

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-9:45 AM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
A.1 Current issues in translingual writing with regard to theory, research, teaching, and assessment (Colloquium)
Tony Silva, Hadi Banat, Negin Hosseini Goodrich, Yue Chen, Ashley Velazquez, Zhaozhe Wang

The aim of this panel session is to go beyond general and abstract accounts of and commentary on a translingual orientation to second language writing by focusing on what happens when translingual ideas are (re)examined and put into practice in specific conceptual, investigative, instructional, and evaluative contexts.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
A.2.1 L2 writing theory and pedagogy in multilingual networked culture (Paper)
Ramesh Pokharel

This paper revisits the traditional notions of contrastive rhetoric through the prism of multilingual networked culture that is grounded on datacloud and findability given the impact of new media and technology, and propose a L2 writing theory and pedagogy that better conceptualizes L2 writers in multilingual networked culture.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
A.2.2 Do English patterns matter in writing?  Divergent perspectives from EFL learners and ESL teachers (Paper)
Y. Gloria Lo, Ying-Hsueh Cheng

This paper compares and contrasts the role of English patterns in writing from the viewpoints of EFL learners and ESL instructors. While EFL learners attach positive benefits to patterns, the ESL teachers hold a different perspective. The divergent perceptions between them call for our attention to EFL writing instruction.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
A.2.3 Textbook Representations of L2 Argumentative Writing (Paper)
Alan Hirvela

This presentation describes a meta-analysis of L2 textbook representations of argumentative writing in an attempt to shed additional light on the treatment of argumentation in L2 writing pedagogy and to enrich scholarship on the important but underdeveloped topic of argumentation in the L2 writing context.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
A.3.1 Let's translanguage! EFL writer's act of translanguaging across languages (Paper)
Tzu-Shan Chang

This paper presents when and how multicompetent EFL writer translanguage during the L1 and L2 composing processes, and how their L1, L2 and even L3 systems are merged as a language super system. This study helps index a way for multicompetent EFL writers to write effectively and creatively across languages.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
A.3.2 Online genres, legitimate knowledge and L2 writing (Paper)
Ron Darvin

Drawing on data from a 2016/17 study of the digital practices of secondary students in Vancouver, this paper examines how L2 learners search for information online, verify sources and discover legitimate knowledge, and calls for the teaching of online genres to develop L2 writing competencies necessary in the knowledge economy.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
A.3.3 Evaluating Part-of-Speech Taggers for L2 Writing Projects (Paper)
Ge Lan

This project evaluated three part-of-speech tagging programs in corpus linguistics (i.e., CLAWS, Tag Ant, and NLTK) based on their precision and recall. The result revealed tagging strength and weakness of the programs. This could offer tips for corpus researchers who are interested in investigating the linguistic dimension of L2 writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
A.4.1 Demystify the Power of Editing Symbols: Insights Gained from Four Decades' Empirical Research (Paper)
Qiandi Liu

Error codes (or editing symbols) have been widely used in providing corrective feedback to student writers. However, regarding fostering improvement in L2 linguistic accuracy, how effective is this meta-linguistic tool compared with other techniques? This meta-analysis of twenty-eight primary studies sheds light on this issue of pedagogical and theoretical importance.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
A.4.2 Proofreading reconsidered: Contesting assumptions about an "international student issue" (Paper)
Nina Conrad

Students' use of proofreading has been framed predominantly as an "international student issue." However, the results of a study exploring proofreading practices among students at a North American university challenge that assumption. This cautionary tale supports a call for further consideration of writers in context and beyond binary terms.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
A.4.3 Examining the patterns of peer interaction during an ESL writing placement test (Paper)
Ha Ram Kim

This study examines the nature of interaction during peer feedback in the pre-writing stage in an ESL writing placement test. Responses to the post-test questionnaire as well as the verbal interaction between test-takers during the peer review were analyzed for patterns of interaction, shared language use, and content and organization.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
A.5.1 Teaching Chinese Students English Academic Writing from the Perspective of ELF (Paper)
Yuqin Hei, Jing Wang

This study is intended to explore how argument writing commonly taught in a stand-alone writing class in Chinese universities can be flexibly adapted to other academic writing situations, focusing on developing students' genre awareness instead of teaching specific essay structures or patterns and conventions regarded as "standard" in English writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
A.5.2 Not available to L2 writers: The linguistic, racial, and class privilege embodied in the label "third culture kids" (Paper)
Stephanie Vandrick

The label "Third Culture Kids" (TCKs) generally describes white, middle-class, English-speaking North American children living in other countries. It embodies linguistic, racial, and class privilege not available to most L2 writing students in English-dominant countries. To investigate this bias and its consequences, the presenter analyzes literature and language about TCKs.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
A.5.3 Multilingual Academic Writing Pedagogy at Internationalised Universities (Paper)
Melanie Brinkschulte

The presentation will introduce the empirically based writing pedagogy of MultiConText: Academic Writing in Multilingual Contexts and offers insights into how the programme is embedded within the internationalisation strategy of the University of Goettingen which aims at internationalising study programmes of all faculties.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
A.6.1 Using intercultural rhetoric to examine translingual practices in second language writing (Paper)
Kyle McIntosh, Ulla Connor, Estela Ene

This paper argues that, by using intercultural rhetoric to analyze linguistic and discourse level features of texts in comparable genres across languages and cultures at different stages in the writing process, scholars, teachers, and students can develop a better sense of how translingual practices work in second language writing contexts.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
A.6.2 The influence of orthographic transparency on EFL writing beginners in Japan: Treatment and results (Paper)
Daniel Dusza

The influence of Romanised Japanese on early English foreign language writing development is underrepresented in research literature. This presentation includes results from three-years of writing development research in a Japanese junior high-school. The influence of native and second language orthographic transparency, language transfer, and language-specific developmental dyslexia will be discussed.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
A.6.3 Language choice and negotiation of authorial identities in pursuing a doctorate (Paper)
Pamela Olmos-Lopez

Many academics can produce successful texts in both English and another language.I argue that the experience of writing in one language influences the authorial identity in another, and that the practices and beliefs about writing in one culture inform the views of PhD writing and the expression of authorial identity.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
A.7.1 Writing development in CLIL in a Japanese primary school: How young learners write in a foreign language (Paper)
Sachiko Yasuda

The purpose of this study is to assess the different components of the writing ability of CLIL students and non-CLIL students in an elementary school in Japan. This study also aimed to explore how a CLIL student learns subject matters (math concepts) and write these concepts in the foreign language.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
A.7.2 Multilingual writing in science at primary school (Paper)
Ewa Bergh Nestlog, Elisabeth Zetterholm

This study about multilingual students' writing during the first years at school, indicates the importance of combining colloquial experiences and disciplinary knowledge when writing science texts. The students communicate school assignments in their different lingual practices and strengthen thereby their willingness to invest in knowledge and skills in both languages.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
A.7.3 Language matters: Understanding multiligual writers in first-year composition (Paper)
Dana Ferris, Grant Eckstein

Through a multiple-case study analysis of 12 focal students, we investigated students' perceived and observed needs for language instruction while enrolled in first-year composition. Results indicated that students felt unprepared for college writing and wanted further English language development, but that their observed needs did not always match their self-perceptions.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
A.8.1 L2 Writers' Metacognitive Knowledge Development in Distance Learning Context: A Case Study of Adult Chinese EFL Learners (Paper)
Naiyi Fincham, Guofang Li

This paper reports on a case study that investigated two adult Chinese EFL learners' metacognitive knowledge (MCK) about EFL writing in the context of web-based distance learning. It details how their writing MCK changed over time, and how contextual factors within this specific distance English program influenced their MCK development.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
A.8.2 Teaching Academic Writing to Korean EFL University Students at an American University in South Korea: Challenges and Strategies for Teaching Writing (Paper)
Marilyn Rahilly

Korean students typically learn English writing by translating grammar and vocabulary from Korean to English. Because of their unfamiliarity with the conventions of academic English writing, Korean college students have difficulty writing essays in English. This presentation focuses on strategies to help Korean students develop more effective academic writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
A.8.3 Multilingual undergraduate writers in economics classes (Paper)
Kendon Kurzer

Via a study investigating the impact of the increasing numbers of multilingual undergraduates in an economics program (using course syllabi and faculty/TA and student surveys and interviews), I found that the department largely did not adequately support multilingual writers, and that multilingual economics students appreciate writing as a learning tool.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
A.9.1 Collaborative teaching in a disciplinary specific  EAP course for doctoral students (Paper)
Orna Ferenz, Keren Goldfrad

Within multilingual and multidisciplinary contexts, collaborative teaching may offer students more than  writing strategies and performance instruction. However, co-teaching may also raise tensions between instructors and students. We will present data documenting tensions and negotiations; student questionnaires; interviews with the instructors and students; and written feedback to students' assignments.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
A.9.2 Constructing a Western realistic discourse in a multilingual context (Paper)
Xinqiang Li

Through classroom consultations and discourse analysis of 15 English  texts in a multilingual composition class, this study aims to examine the realistic features of English reading/writing through non-Western readers' eyes.  In this way, it contributes a special angle to examine and elucidate features of English discourse in the multilingual context.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
A.9.3 Comparing linguistic dimensions of TOEFL iBT Independent and Integrated essays with a corpus of successful student disciplinary writing (Paper)
Lorena Llosa, Eric Friginal, Sara Cushing, Scott Grapin, Margaret Malone

We build on and extend Weigle and Friginal (2015) by comparing the linguistic features of test essays written by non-native speakers in response to both a TOEFL iBT Independent and an Integrated task with a corpus of successful student writing using Biber's (1988) multidimensional analysis framework.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:45 AM-10:10 AM
Coffee Break

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-11:40 AM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
B.1 L2 writing in university contexts (Colloquium)
Ling Shi, Yanning Dong, John Haggerty, Nasrin Kowkabi, Ismaeil Fazel

This colloquium presents four studies in university contexts, illustrating how (1) critical thinking could be taught and assessed, (2) two undergraduates performed disciplinary writing in a sheltered language program, (3) one graduate developed citation decisions in writing a term paper, and (4) two doctoral students wrote for publication.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
B.2.3 One-to-One Writing Conferences as a Teaching Method: a Longitudinal Case Study (Paper)
Charlotte Lin

This presentation will report on a 10-week long case study on using one-to-one writing conferences as a teaching method for teaching English in Quebec, Canada. The results suggest positive development of writing and speaking skills, noticing and self-correction skills, and learning behaviours such as concentration, motivation, and confidence.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
B.3.1 Cross validation of computer-mediated and automated writing evaluations: Investigating ramification as part of argument-based validation (Paper)
Mohaddeseh Mehrzad, Mohammad Rahimi

This study focuses on ramification inference of argument-based validation of a computer-mediated (GoogleDocs) and an automated writing evaluation (Criterion) program. The findings demonstrate that GoogleDocs created more positive washback and helped the students make more improvement in their writing.  Criterion, however, created negative washback due to inappropriate feedback and scoring.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
B.3.2 Strategies for action: Critical issues for L2 writing instructors and how to address them (Paper)
Lan Wang-Hiles

L2 writing instruction parallels L1 writing instruction, borrowing theories from its counterpart. However, they are not identical because L2 writers have dual tasks, writing and linguistic development. This presentation discusses issues appearing in L2 writing classrooms and suggests strategies for L2 writing instructors with some guidelines.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
B.3.3 Tearing down writer's block: A collaborative app for creative writing (Paper)
Anna Twitchell, Euan Bonner

The researchers designed and created a digital multiplayer game and accompanying unit curriculum as a story framework for learners to use as the inspiration for their own creative writing projects in a SLW course at a Japanese university. This approach was well-received by players, and helped significantly reduce writer's block.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
B.4.1 A Conversation about "Editing" Plurilingual Scholars' Thesis Writing (Paper)
James Corcoran, Antoinette Gagne, Megan McIntosh

This presentation unpacks and explores the tensions inherent in providing effective, equitable thesis-writing support for plurilingual graduate students. Insights gained through trivocalic discussions between faculty and writing centre experts are presented alongside questions for consideration by those responsible for supporting an increasingly diverse population of graduate student researchers.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
B.4.2 Long-Term Effect of Written Corrective Feedback on EFL Students' Accurate Use of Articles (Paper)
Ahsan Pashazadeh, Hamideh Marefat

This study suggests that Truscott's concern about inefficacy of WCF is legitimate as far as complex structures are concerned and his thesis deserves to be considered an option in writing courses. L2 teachers should reassess WCF, an instructional practice that takes up a large portion of their already limited time.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
B.4.3 Second Language Writing at the Crossroads:  Deliberating the Future of the Field (Paper)
Dwight Atkinson, Christine Tardy

In this presentation, we consider how two prominent movements in writing studies--translingualism and written corrective feedback--have influenced SLW. By considering the wide gap between fluid self-expression and accurate application of linguistic/texual norms, we articulate some of the rich contours of SLW and imagine possibilities for its future.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
B.5.1 Does foreign language learning anxiety affect the effectiveness of the written feedback on Indonesian student's English writing? (Paper)
Gatot Prasetyo

The proposed study investigates whether foreign language learning anxiety affects the written feedback Indonesian university students receive on their writing, and if so, which type of feedback is the most effective in improving the English writing development of the students with low and high anxiety level.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
B.5.2 Coaching EFL writers in practicing peer feedback: A systemic functional perspective (Paper)
Honghao Xie, Zairan Liu, Jinyu Wang, Xiaodong Zhang

This study uses systemic functional linguistics as a teaching tool in fostering EFL writers' meta-linguistic knowledge at the level of both language form and meaning and developing their  skills in providing feedback.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
B.5.3 Talking for writing: Second-language learners’ verbal scaffolding during collaborative and independent writing (Paper)
Yuko Watanabe

How do EAP students use verbal scaffolding to mediate their writing process? I compared learner-generated talk while writing in pairs and independently in terms of language-related, text-related and scaffolding episodes. The findings demonstrated similar trends for both collaborative and independent contexts but rendered support for collaborative writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
B.5.3 Translanguaging and polylanguaging as coping strategies in an English-medium business programme: The voices of EFL students (Skype)
Awad Alhassan, Holi Ali

The presentation will explore the use of translanguaging and polylanguaging as coping strategies by EFL Sudanese business students in English-medium (EMI) business programme. The data analysis revealed that translanguaging and polylanguaging strategies were widely used among other strategies to handle EMI-related challenges such as comprehending lectures and understanding discipline-specific terminology.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
B.6.1 Negotiating voice and modality in graduate writing (Paper)
Hedy McGarrell

This study investigated the use of meta-discursive resources in the texts of participants from three different L1 backgrounds (Arabic, English or Mandarin.  Similarities and differences in the texts, argumentative papers on the same topic, will be discussed and compared to results from similar studies to identify implications for writing development.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
B.6.2 Face-to-face peer talk in collaborative writing in a multilingual composition classroom (Paper)
Jui-Hsin Hung, Chaoran Wang

This study explored whether collaborative writing tasks created space for peer scaffolding for L2 learners by looking into language aspects of the students' peer dialogue, the potential role of L1, and student perception of collaborative writing and the use of L1 during peer interactions in a multilingual writing classroom.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
B.7.1 Characteristics of emerging literacy: written language development of US elementary school students (Paper)
Mark Chapman, Heather Elliott

This presentation addresses bilingual and multilingual students' written language development as they mature and receive writing instruction. Attendees will review authentic writing samples produced by K–5 ELL students from across the United States, with special attention paid to characteristics that distinguish between students at different levels of language development.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
B.7.2 Scoring the written language of bilingual and multilingual elementary school students: what is construct relevant? (Paper)
Heather Elliott, Mark Chapman

This presentation addresses the scoring of K–5 students' writing on a large-scale, high-stakes assessment. Attendees will see how developmentally appropriate aspects of writing are operationalized in the rubric and how aspects deemed inappropriate are excluded from scoring. In the process, they will see multiple samples of authentic student writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
B.7.3 Comparing grammatical structures in French L2 class: Effects on metalinguistic awareness and writing efficiency of Grade 11 students in both English L1 and French L2 (Paper)
Claude Quevillon Lacasse

Overview of an ongoing doctoral thesis on the effects of grammatical teaching respecting key teaching principles informed by research in the field and including the comparison of structures in two languages (English L1 and French L2).

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
B.8.1 Supporting EFL writers' construction of meaning-making beliefs and academic writer identities (Paper)
Xiaodong Zhang

Drawing on Systemic functional linguistics (SFL) as a teaching praxis in an English as a foreign language writing course, the study shows that through exposure to the SFL-based writing curriculum, the students were able to construct linguistically endorsed writing and project their identity as a member of academic writing communities.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
B.8.2 "I will find my way": A case study of multilingual students developing their aspirational identities (Paper)
Hannah Soblo

Through the experiences of nine multilingual students negotiating their identities and hopes for the future within a FYC program, this presentation delineates a new model for identity research termed aspirational identities. Results focus on the influence of students' aspirations for the future on their investment and agency in current contexts.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
B.8.3 Writer background and voice construction in L2 writing (Paper)
Cecilia Guanfang Zhao

The study empirically investigated the impact of writer background variables on voice construction in L2 writing. Results showed that L2 students with an Indo-European L1 background wrote with a slightly higher interactional voice. The small effect size, however, calls for cautious interpretations of such results to avoid extreme cultural essentialism.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
B.9.1 Preparing for College: The Educational Paths of U.S.-Bound Chinese High School Students (Paper)
Levin Arnsperger

In my current project, I am trying to identify how Chinese high school students are prepared to study in U.S. colleges. I will ultimately try to show the entire process, from making the decision all the way to adapting to the U.S. college system.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
B.9.2 Writing assignments, genre awareness and English proficiency: A survey of university students in China (Paper)
Haiying Feng

The study surveyed the frequency and genre types of English writing assignments at a top-tier university in China and investigated its correlation with students' genre awareness and writing proficiency. Descriptive and statistical findings would provide insights for higher education policy-makers as well as EAP researchers and practitioners.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
B.9.3 Accelerated learning program: What works for English language learners? (Paper)
Marta Shcherbakova

An investigation of the Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) for English Language Learners (ELL) assesses the model, in which the same instructor teaches two linked writing courses, through examination of theoretical foundations for ALP and analysis of ELI students' surveys, offering a working syllabus along with sample assignments.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 11:40 AM-12:45 PM
Lunch Break

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 12:45 PM-1:00 PM
Opening Remarks

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
Plenary I Reexamining second language writing in the era of fluidity (Plenary)
Paul Kei Matsuda

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:00 PM-2:10 PM
Break

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:10 PM-2:40 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
C.3.1 Challenges for teaching writing in secondary schools: A case study of two aspiring English teachers (Paper)
Yutaka Fujieda

The presenter will show a pilot case study of two Japanese undergraduate students aspiring to be an English teacher. This presentation will illustrate how the participants yield various ways of teaching writing and reflect their professional viewpoints of teaching writing through their experiences of disciplinary classes.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:40 PM-3:10 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
C.3.2 How does linguistic competence of multilingual graduate writers correlate with higher order writing competences of all graduate students? (Paper)
Elena Kallestinova

How can self-identified linguistic competence of multilingual students help us address writing needs of all graduate students? By providing a quantitative analysis of a university-wide survey, students' appointment requests, and consultants' client reports, I call for more explicit instructions in developing discipline-specific writing competencies for all groups of graduate students.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 3:10 PM-3:40 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
C.3.3 Creativity and multilingual students: Toward a conceptual framework for creative thinking in academic L2 writing (Paper)
Matthew Allen, Hannah Bush

Creative thinking is an invaluable but underexplored concept for multilingual writers in academic contexts. In this presentation, we define creative thinking from a developmental perspective and situate this concept in a pedagogy that engages students in a process of inquiry and discovery across multiple modes of learning and communication.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:10 PM-2:40 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
C.4.1 A survey study on language of publication preferences among multilingual social and natural sciences researchers in Taiwan (Paper)
Cheryl L. Sheridan

This survey study investigated the language preferences of 199 multilingual social and natural sciences researchers in Taiwan. Results show English is their preferred language for journal publication, but both groups also write in Chinese for journals and books respectively. Implications of national science policies on Taiwanese research production are considered.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:40 PM-3:10 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
C.4.2 A Comparison of Authorial Voice Constructed in Citation in Literature Reviews of Doctoral Theses across Training Contexts (Paper)
Jian-E Peng

This study compares authorial voice constructed in citation in the literature review chapter in 20 doctoral theses written by home-grown and overseas-trained Chinese writers. Integral and non-integral citations and citations containing quotations, summary, generalization, and reporting verbs were analyzed, which were complemented by interviews with four of the writers.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:10 PM-2:40 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
C.5.1 Helping Students become researchers to improve Academic Writing in Higher Education (Paper)
Hilda Hidalgo Avilés, Norma Angélica Espinosa Butrón

We discuss the experience of helping Mexican undergraduate students become researchers as they learn how to write in English for academic purposes.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:40 PM-3:10 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
C.5.2 Scaffolding library research skills for L2 writers: A collaborative approach (Paper)
Megan Siczek, Ann Brown

This presentation outlines the collaborative reimagining of a partnership between the university library and an EAP program, providing a model for building a strategic, scaffolded, and replicable mechanism to help develop L2 writers' research skills while at the same time leveraging the global and multilingual resources of the institution.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 3:10 PM-3:40 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
C.5.3 Student perceptions of non-native English-speaking tutors at a Japanese writing center (Paper)
Tomoyo Okuda

In writing center studies, non-native English speaking tutors have received less attention in research. Drawing from student stances and motives research (Zhu & Mitchell, 2012), this paper examines how tutor performances, stances, and roles match with and are evaluated in relation to tutees' motives for the improvement of their writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:10 PM-2:40 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
C.6.1 Rhetorical awareness and organization of Chinese students' English expository writing (Paper)
Kai-lin Wu

This study investigated Chinese students' rhetorical awareness and organization of English writing. 37 expository essays and awareness questionnaires were analyzed. Students were aware of directness in writing, but their writing differed in the location of main idea and quality of organization. The results showed correlation between rhetorical awareness and structures.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:40 PM-3:10 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
C.6.2 Exploring the relationship between cognitive individual difference variables and L2 writing performance (Paper)
Yingli Yang, Pengyun Chang, Yingyi Zhang

This study examines the relationship between working memory, language aptitude and L2 writing performance. Results showed: working memory and total scores of language aptitude are correlated; language aptitude could account for partial variance of accuracy, but working memory and language aptitude could not predict fluency or complexity of L2 writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 3:10 PM-3:40 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
C.6.3 Investigating the effect of source characteristics on task comparability in integrated writing tasks (Paper)
Maryam Homayounzadeh, Mahboobeh Saadat

This study explores task comparability in integrated writing tasks by verifying which prompt characteristics, if any, could cause variations in the quality of test-takers' responses to two authentic read-listen-write (RLW) tasks and also by considering which task characteristics, if any, are likely to cause variations in raters' assessment.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:10 PM-2:40 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
C.7.1 Do multilingual doctoral students develop an authorial voice over time? (Paper)
Neomy Storch, Janne Morton

We investigated representations and development of authorial voice from readers' perspectives.   Three experienced supervisors read two versions of three  EAL doctoral students' writing from the same field. The readers agreed about the importance and distinguishing traits of authorial voice but disagreed when evaluating development of voice in the students' texts

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:40 PM-3:10 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
C.7.2 Modes of engagement: The range of motivations for writing about yourself in another language (Paper)
Mika Toff

This presentation uses examples to show how a Japanese student writer's motivation can develop from vague or superficial to life changing through sustained writing in English. Writing about her life in English allows the student to not only express her experiences in new ways but reposition them through deeper engagement.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 3:10 PM-3:40 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
C.7.3 Enriching genre knowledge changing Identity: Two Chinese MA thesis writers (Paper)
Jun Zhao, Yingliang Liu

This presentation examines content and structure changes in the Abstract, Introduction and Conclusion sections of two Chinese English MA theses' multiple drafts and corresponding advisor feedback. Interview data support textual analyses on students' struggling identities and enriched genre knowledge of making persuasive claims for academic audience with advisor help.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:10 PM-2:40 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
C.8.1 The relationship between text borrowing patterns and second language proficiency (Paper)
Lixia Cheng, David Crouch

This study examined the relationship between text borrowing and second language proficiency, based on analysis of 50 L1 Chinese timed essays.  Results showed a strong, positive correlation (r=0.84, p=0.019) between the extent of accurate, syntactic/morphological reformulation, and slight modification of text from the prompt and writers' TOEFL iBT total score.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:40 PM-3:10 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
C.8.2 Learning to argue or arguing to learn: Writing instructors' perspective on English argumentation (Paper)
Jingjing Qin

This case study adopting a grounded theory approach explored how writing instructors conceptualised and taught English argumentation to Arabic-speaking university students in a UAE government university. Interviews, class observations, and teaching materials and activities were analysed to understand how argumentation is operationalised in a specific L2 context.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 3:10 PM-3:40 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
C.8.3 An analysis of English writing tutors' assessment of Japanese expository essays (Paper)
Junko Otoshi

This presentation reports on a case study which explored English writing tutors's assessment of Japanese expository essays using three different types of rubrics. The results of facet analyses will be presented focusing on the rater's self-consistency, the dimension difficulty, and the bias interaction between raters and rubrics.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:10 PM-2:40 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
C.9.1 Uptake and Production of Formulaic Expressions in Second Language Email Writing (Paper)
Erik Fritz

Genre based EFL research has highlighted the need for students to learn formulaic expressions. The email writing genre has many common formulaic expressions. The current study examines the uptake of email formulaic expressions for over 500 Japanese university students. The presenters will discuss the results and EFL email genre writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 2:40 PM-3:10 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
C.9.2 The role of L2 motivational self system and task motivation in L2 writing performance across genres: An exploratory study. (Paper)
Masakazu Mishima

The present study aims to explore how much explanatory value motivational constructs (i.e., trait motivation) hold in accounting for variability in L2 writing performance across three different school genres of writing: book report, descriptive and persuasive essays. The study also examines the role of state motivation—writing task motivation.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 3:10 PM-3:40 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
C.9.3 The effects of writer interaction with genre-based AWE on revision processes (Paper)
Elena Cotos, Sarah Huffman, Stephanie Link

This study examines deliberate processes that occur in the working memory during writers' interaction with an AWE system for scientific writing. Results show that such interaction can foster fundamental revision processes such as strategizing, reflection, and problem solving, as well as improvement of the textual representation of rhetorical intent.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 3:40 PM-4:00 PM
Coffee Break

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:30 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
D.2.1 The strength of argument elements in Chinese EFL undergraduate students' argumentative writing (Paper)
Guangsa Jin, Yifan Geng

This study explores the moves employed by Chinese EFL undergraduate students in their argumentative essays and the quality of the moves. It aims to examine the relation between move structure, the strength of moves and essay quality, as well as investigate the instructors' criteria of evaluating the argument moves.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:00 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
D.2.2 Writing an article-style dissertation in TESOL/Applied Linguistics: Insights from practice (Paper)
Tim Anderson, Tomoyo Okuda

This presentation outlines a basic framework for writing an article-style thesis or dissertation in TESOL and Applied Linguistics fields. Foregrounded in relevant literature, the two authors reflect on their own experiences writing, defending, and preparing for publication from their own dissertations during and following their recently completed doctoral study.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:30 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
D.2.3 Writing a meaningful and interesting book review in your L1 or L2 (Paper)
Christine Pearson Casanave, Yongyan Li

We are interested in how book reviews in our field can be written in ways that go beyond a stereotypical genre. In this talk, we make a case for why a book review genre can be more substantive, demanding, and interesting than it is often thought to be.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:30 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
D.3.1 Exploring second-language teachers' identities through academic writing: A narrative-case of three Nepalese English teachers (Paper)
Shyam Pandey

How do multilingual writing teachers construct their professional identities through the use of academic writing? Using data from individual interviews and written artifacts, this session reports on a narrative-case study of three Nepalese EFL teachers' perceptions and professional trajectories of identity construction via their involvement in academic writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:00 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
D.3.2 "It's multilingual learner, as in like you're still learning": Complicating assumptions of the "multilingual" student identity in higher education (Paper)
Jennifer Johnson, Norah Fahim

A discourse analysis of multilingual student narratives complicates assumptions of the multilingual student writer identity.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:30 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
D.3.3 Investigating the Influence of L1 on L2 Writing: A Contrastive Study on EFL Learners (Paper)
Quoc Tung Nguyen, Kieu Van Le Thi

This study exposes the differences and similarities between the argumentative essays written in L2 and those composed in L1. Furthermore, the study examines the extent to which L1 influences on L2 and later evaluate whether this influence is positive or negative for the composing process of second language writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:30 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
D.3.3 From Mainstream to International Composition Courses: How do ITAs Construct and Transform their Teacher Identity? (Paper)
Phuong Tran, Kenny Tanemura, Yachao Sun

This presentation features the construction and transformation of teacher identity in International Teaching Assistants (ITAs) of first-year composition in a US higher education context. Findings demonstrate that different pedagogical, linguistic, cultural and classroom factors affected their teacher identity. Implications for Writing Program Administrators on preparing ITAs to teach are provided.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:30 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
D.5.1 What's the "problem" statement? An investigation of problem-based writing in first-year engineering (Paper)
Ashley Velazquez

Using a corpus-based approach to written discourse analysis, this presentation describes the linguistic features and coherence relations developing L1 and L2 writers use when writing problem statements in a first-year engineering program at a STEM-focused research institution. Results will inform the conventions of problem statements and writing instruction in FYE.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:00 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
D.5.2 Exploring the relationship between TOEFL iBT test and EFL written Complexity, Accuracy and Fluency at the university level (Paper)
Isabel Tejada-Sanchez

This research examines the predictive scope of CAF (Complexity, Accuracy, Fluency) to inform university students' performance on the TOEFL iBT test. Following a pre-post design, TOEFL iBT writing tasks (N=224) were analyzed focusing on CAF. Correlation and regression were used to explore how well CAF measures predict TOEFL iBT scores.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:30 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
D.6.1 Identifying the Parents: Tracing the History of L2W in China (Paper)
Yue Chen

It is not necessary and even dangerous to adopt one single framework to investigate the history of and to describe the works on L2W in various contexts. To illustrate, the presenter compares the origin of L2W in China with that in the US through a synthesis of existing literature.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:00 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
D.6.2 An Analysis of Logical Flow in Japanese University students' Argumentative Writing (Paper)
Wakasa Nagakura, Madoka Kawano

The investigators delivered a five-week module to teach argumentative writing to Japanese university students in Japan and examined common issues in constructing a logical and coherent essay. Results will be discussed in light of pedagogical suggestions to improve L2 Academic English writing.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:30 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
D.7.1 A writing center for everyone: Creating better writers via rapport, respect, and relationship building (Paper)
Robert Cote

The Writing Skills Improvement Program uses a Rapport, Respect, Relationship approach. Methods, programs, and institutes (Graduate, Young Writers, and Women of Color) that assist our community will be presented along with student successes to inspire centers to implement changes to their programs that will improve writing tutees' experiences overall.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:00 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
D.7.2 Portrait of the L2 writer as a writing center visitor (Paper)
Vicki Kennell, Molly Rentscher

This presentation clarifies writing centers' roles in L2 writers' development and demonstrates how context-specific data aids programmatic decisions.  Based on IRB-exempt data collected at R1 institutions, the speakers show how creating local portraits of L2 writers can improve writing center tutoring and help staff address assumptions about L2 writers' needs.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:30 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
D.7.3 Each other's people: Intensive English program and writing center partnerships (Paper)
Whitney Sarver, Dinorah Sapp, Brad Campbell

As service units, both the Intensive English Program (IEP) and the Writing Center (WC) hold unique positions at the university.  The presenters will discuss present collaborations and plans for the future in order to illustrate the benefits that interdepartmental partnerships can bring to everyone involved.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:30 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
D.8.1 The effects of synchronous corrective feedback in computer-mediated collaborative writing (Paper)
Taichi Yamashita

The present study investigated the effects of corrective feedback in computer-mediated collaborative writing. 40 ESL students worked on animation description tasks with corrective feedback offered only to the experimental group. The results indicated the moderating effects of learners' roles (i.e., uptaker, observer) and linguistic features (i.e., definite/indefinite articles).

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:00 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
D.8.2 Placement of multilingual writers: Combining formal assessment and self-evaluation (Paper)
Dana Ferris, Jamie Ferrando, Amy Lombardi

To assess whether students could effectively participate in their own placement process, a group of students in a multilingual writing program were allowed the opportunity to choose between two placement levels. Their success rates and satisfaction levels were compared to a group that was not given a choice between levels.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:30 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
D.8.3 Assessment of Second Language writing in an EAP course in Brazil (Paper)
Laura Knijnik Baumvol, Simone Sarmento, Ana Paula Vial

This paper discusses assessment in L2 English writing in the context of a EAP course in a Brazilian university based on the qualitative analysis of students' written production, as well as the pedagogical material and grading system adopted. Improvements in the assessment practices and holistic assessment rubrics are proposed.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:00 PM-4:30 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
D.9.1 Distinguishing the Purposes of L2 Writing Assessments (Paper)
Alister Cumming

This presentation defines and distinguishes normative, formative, and summative purposes for assessing writing in second or international languages, reviews relevant research about them, describes relevant, exemplary pedagogical practices, and offers practical advice for teachers, teacher educators, and curriculum organizers.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:00 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
D.9.2 Teacher cognition and use of electronic feedback in multilingual EAP writing courses (Paper)
Estela Ene

This presentation explores the alignment between teacher perception and actual use of teacher e-feedback in EAP composition classes at a US university.  E-feedback given on papers and in online chats are analyzed in light of teachers' stated feedback priorities.  Implications for implementing effective electronic feedback with multilingual writers are discussed.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 5:00 PM-5:30 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
D.9.3 EFL Taiwanese undergraduate writers' decision-making in accepting or abandoning computer-mediated peer feedback (Paper)
Carrie Yea-huey Chang

Writers' revision/decision-making process upon receiving peer feedback has long been an important yet under-researched area in SLW. To bridge this gap, this exploratory study is to understand the reasons behind EFL Taiwanese college students' adoption and/or non-adoption of reviewer feedback in asynchronous web-based peer review.

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 6:00 PM-7:30 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
Opening Reception

Friday, August 3, 2018

Friday, August 3, 2018, 8:15 AM-9:15 AM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
Plenary II Ideologies and realities on plurilingual academic writers in multilingual contexts: Seeking clarity and advocacy (Plenary)
Ryuko Kubota

Friday, August 3, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:40 AM
Coffee Break sponsored by Pearson ELT

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:00 AM-10:20 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
E.2.2 Negotiations around research and writing: Master's students' learning to develop academic identities (Roundtable)
Yan Zhang

Postgraduate studies involve strategic negotiations around research and writing. The study seeks to understand how negotiations, through written feedback and oral discussions, shape students' textual practices and identities. It reports Tom learned to develop literature review to match the requirements of dissertation, and present himself as a novice researcher.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:20 AM-10:40 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
E.2.3 Article writing in light of moves analysis: Awareness raising among Iranian TEFL students (Roundtable)
Fahimeh Marefat, Marzieh Marefat

This study investigated the extent to which explicit genre instruction helped 10 novice nonnative MA students gain genre knowledge of research article rhetorical structure and moves. Repeated decoding and recoding of research article sections helped establish a repertoire of moves and become able to exploit these moves to meet needs.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 9:40 AM-10:00 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
E.3.1 Ancient pearls' divers at the shores of the Arabian Gulf: An examination of argumentation among SLW teachers (Roundtable)
Anoud Abusalim

This presentation reports on the findings of an empirical study about the conceptualization of argumentation and its instruction approaches among SLW teachers in a writing department at an American-modeled university located in the Gulf. The study explores how issues like assessment constrains and teachers' backgrounds affect pedagogical approaches.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:00 AM-10:20 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
E.3.2 L1 Use in L2 Writing: A Case of Multilingual Undergraduates in a Basic Writing Course (Roundtable)
Lal Rana

In this presentation, the presenter presents the finding of a research conducted to explore the purposes for which multilingual writers use their L1s while writing genre-based essays in English. It was found that they mainly use their L1s for planning essays, supplying vocabularies, reducing cognitive load and editing.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:00 AM-10:20 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
E.4.2 EFL academic writing skills, writing quality, and metacognitive awareness: The effects of cooperative-metacognitive guidance (Roundtable)
Mark Feng Teng

This study highlights the benefits of cooperative-metacognitive guidance in the improvement of English writing for EFL students.  The students with cooperative-metacognitive guidance could yield the highest mean scores in academic writing skills, writing quality, and the metacognitive regulation.However, the development of metacognitive knowledge is still an open question.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:20 AM-10:40 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
E.4.3 Multimodal Translation: An Approach to Develop Reading and Writing Skills and Empower L2 Learners. (Roundtable)
Ana Sanchez

This paper shows how multimodal translation can be a tool to develop reading and writing skills and give agency to L2 learners. L2 students need to use a top down and bottom up approach as they negotiate to transfer meaning from the source text to the target text and audience.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 9:40 AM-10:00 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
E.5.1 An ethnographic exploration of first-year international Chinese undergraduate experiences in an academic writing course in the U.S. (Roundtable)
Jing Yu

Drawing on theoretical frameworks from second language socialization, academic discourse socialization and the notion of languaculture, the study aims to make visible how international students are socialized into both vernacular and academic discourse registers and argue for 'third space' strategy to help them adjust more adequately and effectively.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:00 AM-10:20 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
E.5.2 A Study into the Writing Performance of Moroccan Advanced EFL writers: An Intercultural Rhetoric Approach (Roundtable)
Brahim Khartite, Badiaa Zerhouni

The study compares persuasive essays by Moroccan advanced EFL and English Native students to identify what rhetorical dimensions of English persuasive writing, if any, are problematic for Moroccans. Explore Kaplan's 1966 focal  claim that the writing problems of native Arabic speakers is a result  of negative rhetorical interference.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:20 AM-10:40 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
E.5.3 The effect of collaborative dialogue on argumentation essay writing (Roundtable)
Elizabeth Carmack

In linguistics collaborative dialogue develops language proficiency through potential peer and self correction. How interlanguaging and interthinking are related still needs to be determined. Interlanguaging develops language proficiency through intermental and intramental processes, but does interthinking within the context of dialogic argumentation develop intermental and intramental processes advancing critical thinking?

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:40 AM-10:50 AM
Break

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
F.1.1 The effect of speedwriting and task repetition on writing fluency (Paper)
Naoko Hosoda

I investigated the effectiveness of speedwriting and task repetition on improving writing fluency by analyzing students' texts and reflective comments. Results show that the groups that completed speedwriting made greater progress than the control group. However, repeating the same topic had minimal effect on number of words per text.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
F.1.2 Teaching for Transfer in L2 Source-based Writing Instruction (Paper)
Heon Jeon

Using the notions of teaching for transfer and hugging-bridging framework, this presentation will discuss the dimensions and instructional tools of teaching for transfer in L2 source-based writing instruction.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
F.2.1 "I need to work on…but I think I can get there*": Responses of international graduate students to the academic discourse socialisation challenges of studying in English medium universities in the United Kingdom and New Zealand (Paper)
Rosemary Wette, Clare Furneaux

This presentation draws on narrative frames and interview data to report on the views of 31 international graduate students from 20 countries on the academic discourse socialisation challenges they face on entry to English medium universities, the coping strategies they report using, and the kinds of support they consider helpful.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
F.2.2 Disciplinary writing challenges arising from EMI: Experiences of Omani engineering students (Paper)
Holi Ali, Abdelrahman Salih

This presentation looks into some of the salient disciplinary writing difficulties encountered by engineering students in an Omani public college. The findings revealed a number of writing challenges and some coping strategies for handling them. The presentation will provide insights for EAP/ESP practitioners as well as disciplinary and content teachers.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
F.3.1 Analysis of Chinese-writing coursebooks for international students in recent 20 years (Paper)
Yan Tian

By using statistical analysis method, content analysis method, comparative analysis method, this paper tries to explore the Chinese-writing coursebooks for international students in recent 20 years from there aspects: the developmental process of Chinese-writing course books ,  the main features of Chinese-writing coursebooks ,and  suggestions on Chinese-writing coursebooks compilation.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
F.3.2 The role of academic writing in an advanced Chinese Flagship class: A language socialization approach (Paper)
Yingling Bao

Using the framework of language socialization, the case study explores how advanced students are socialized into academic writing and the goals of a Chinese Flagship Program. Findings show some discrepancy between the program goal and learners' personal goals due to the limited role writing plays.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
F.4.1 Effects of real-time automated written corrective feedback on self-initiated revision and writing quality (Paper)
Jim Ranalli, Taichi Yamashita

Recent research suggests immediate corrective feedback on L2 student writing can benefit grammar acquisition, but little is known about how immediate feedback may affect students' revision behavior or the overall quality of their writing. We investigated these issues using Grammarly, a popular commercial tool for automated written corrective feedback (AWCF).

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
F.4.2 Formative assessment to promote critical thinking in academic writing class: Case studies of teacher feedback in Chinese context (Paper)
Zhenjing Wang

The quality of what students produce in academic writing depends precisely on the quality of their thought. This study enhances our understanding of the conception of critical thinking in EAP writing class, and it provides us a rich picture of how teachers use feedback to help their students think critically.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
F.5.1 Translanguaging and scaffolding approaches to tutoring second language writers (Paper)
Lara Hauer

This presentation foregrounds current research on a translanguaging approach as it has been used to scaffold L2 writers' fluency. I will review the approach and engage participants in discussion of how it may work in their contexts. It addresses bi/multilingualism in higher education (conferencing with L2 students; writing center tutoring).

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
F.5.2 Redesigning an EAP course: From generic conventions to genre flexibility and negotiation (Paper)
Eleanor K. P. Kwan, Kan Chai

This paper examines a case about the redesigning of an EAP course in an English-medium university, reflecting a shift from an emphasis on rhetorical conventions acquisition to genre flexibility and negotiation. Teacher feedback as well as students texts will be used to examine the effectiveness of the course materials.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
F.6.1 Approaching Plurality in EFL Writing at the University Level (Paper)
Laura Kobata, Nicolangelo Becce, Albert Latorella Lehner

In response to priorities established by the Ministry of Education in Japan, three university EFL instructors discuss a pluralistic approach to teaching EAP writing which prioritizes students' culture—including LI and approaches to writing. Students follow a two-year sequence of writing courses in preparation for a period of study abroad.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
F.6.2 Native and Non-Native English Writing Teachers: Student Perceptions in Turkey (Paper)
Kaine Gülözer

This study aims to investigate the perceptions of the 5th grade students (N=220) taking English writing course at a secondary school about NESTs and NNESTs. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to trace how NESTs and NNESTs impact the writing course in a K-12 setting.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
F.7.1 Making Visible the Dominant Discourses of Monolingualism in Undergraduate Education (Paper)
Madelyn Tucker Pawlowski, Tanya Tercero, Brad Jacobson, Jennifer Slinkard

Presenters draw from a collection of student and teacher interviews, classroom observation, assignment guidelines, rubrics, and policy documents gathered from First-Year Writing and general education settings to demonstrate the (often unnoticed) ways in which a monolingual ideology permeates the first-year student experience. Ways to challenge these discourses will be explored.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
F.7.2 Writing for Publication Pedagogy as Critical Plurilingual Practice (Paper)
Karen Englander, James Corcoran

This presentation outlines a critical, pluriligual pedogogical approach to writing for publication. Presenters suggest the foundational elements of this progressive, empirically-driven, plurilingual approach, how it differs from other extant writing for publication pedagogies, and how it may be adapted to meet local realities across geolinguistic contexts.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:50 AM-11:20 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
F.8.1 Marginalized and Assessed: How Translingual Approaches Can Jeopardize L2 Writers (Paper)
Deborah Crusan, Todd Ruecker

Uncritical proponents of translingual approaches often ignore broader power relations which marginalize L2 students and their teachers.   In this presentation, we illustrate the limitations of translingual scholarship and suggest ways for scholars to become active in shaping the uses and types of assessments that our students encounter.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:20 AM-11:50 AM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
F.8.2 Mexican EFL University teachers and writing assessment training: A study of training impact on classroom writing assessment (Paper)
Elsa Fernanda Gonzalez

The presentation discusses the impact that two writing assessment-training sessions encouraged in eleven Mexican EFL university teachers and their classroom assessment of writing. Data revealed impact on the teaching of writing, assessment of writing and teachers´ meta-analysis skills. The presentation finalizes with possible implications for EFL classroom assessment and researchers.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:50 AM-12:50 PM
Lunch Break

Friday, August 3, 2018, 11:50 AM-12:50 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
JSLW Editorial Board Meeting (Closed Meeting)

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-2:20 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
G.1 Novice writers and scholarly publication: Authors, mentors, gatekeepers (Colloquium)
Pejman Habibie, Christine Pearson Casanave, Dana Ferris, Ron Darvin, Ismaeil Fazel

This colloquium addresses the topic of writing for scholarly publication by junior scholars. Bringing together international scholars from a variety of disciplines, it discusses research in the field and personal publishing experiences. It seeks to present a nuanced picture of the challenges of Anglophone and multilingual scholars in scholarly publication.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
G.2.1 Needs of international students in mainstream first-year composition class in U.S. higher education (Paper)
Qiusi Zhang

This case study investigates needs of international students in U.S. college mainstream first-year composition classes. Analysis of data from interviews, class observations, and various written documents reveals that international students call for specific instruction and help with rhetorical and strategic learning, and are less concerned with grammar, vocabulary, and participation.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:20 PM-1:50 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
G.2.2 You will not falter: Syllabus rhetoric and second language writers (Paper)
Jennifer Russum

In this interactive session, I will share anonymous excerpts from real college syllabi that state expectations for student writing. Scholars in the audience will analyze the deeper assumptions and prejudices attached to syllabus rhetoric and reflect upon how these statements might affect second language students on our college campuses.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:50 PM-2:20 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
G.2.3 A mixed-method learning analytics study on the impact of L2 writing performance under the ability-grouping policy in higher education (Paper)
Dennis Foung, Julia Chen

This presentation describes a mix-method learning analytics study on L2 EAP writing performance in a Hong Kong university and suggests that ability-grouping works in this context, especially in improving skills-based performance. This observation is supported by analysis of students' scripts. The session will conclude with policy-level and methodological recommendations.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
G.3.1 Toward A Transdisciplinary Model of Second Language Writing Studies (Paper)
Zhaozhe Wang

I will theorize and argue for a strong transdisciplinary model of second language writing studies that moves beyond the current reactive, instrumental, issue-driven, and problem-oriented interdisciplinary model, and discuss its implications for the sustainability of the field of second language writing studies.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:20 PM-1:50 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
G.3.2 Developing Students' Biliteracies in Rural Schools: Promises and Challenges (Paper)
Todd Ruecker

In recent decades, the traditionally monolingual spaces of the rural U.S. have diversified.  Drawing on five months of visits to six rural schools in the Southwestern U.S., the presenter will show how various factors shape the way school staff and community members support or hinder English L2 students' biliteracy development.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:50 PM-2:20 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
G.3.3 Intertextuality in Writing Process and Product: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Source Use in Disciplinary Assignments (Paper)
Leonie Wiemeyer

This study explores the processes and products of source-based L2 writing in disciplinary courses in English studies. It combines corpus data with screen recordings and retrospective interviews with stimulated recall to identify the intertextual strategies and textual borrowing practices used by L2 students when writing summaries of research articles.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
G.4.1 Chinese University Teachers' Beliefs and Practices of Assessment for Learning in EFL Writing (Paper)
Lu Wang, Yubo Wang

The study investigates how university EFL writing teachers perceive different assessment for learning and assessment of learning oriented classroom assessment practices, as well as how frequent they think they use these assessment practices by conducting a questionnaire survey and individual interviews with Chinese university EFL writing teachers.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:20 PM-1:50 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
G.4.2 Voices from the periphery: Japanese university English teachers' challenges in writing and research career development (Paper)
Mai Matsuno

The study is a narrative inquiry investigating the challenges that four mid-career Japanese university English teachers faced in developing their writing and research careers. It illuminates the conflicts they experienced over the course of their careers as they were navigating both the world of academia and that of teaching.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:50 PM-2:20 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
G.4.3 Instructor Perception of Lexical Quality in Multilingual Writers' Texts (Paper)
Melanie Gonzalez

The present study reports the results of a mixed judgment task and follow-up questionnaire that sought writing instructors' perceptions of lexical quality in first-year college writing tasks. Findings reveal how and in what ways multilingual writers' deployment of vocabulary influences evaluators' judgments of an academic text's overall lexical quality.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
G.5.1 Looking under the hood: How do EFL Learners perceive and respond to automated corrective feedback? (Paper)
Giang Hoang

Automated corrective feedback is becoming a prevalent part of second language writing, yet its impact on learners' composition and revisions has been under-explored. This longitudinal quasi-experiment on EFL students' use of ETS Criterion provides significant findings of their cognitive engagement with automated corrective feedback and subsequent revision practices.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:20 PM-1:50 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
G.5.2 Understanding student engagement with peer feedback on master's theses: A Macau study (Paper)
Shulin Yu, Yao Zheng

Drawing upon multiple sources of data including semi-structured interviews, stimulated recalls, drafts of master's theses, and peer written/oral feedback, this case study examines how three master's students affectively, behaviourally and cognitively engaged with peer feedback on drafts of their thesis in a Master of Education programme at a Macau university.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:50 PM-2:20 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
G.5.3 Can Chinese students in heterogeneous cultural groupings achieve successful peer feedback interaction? (Paper)
Qiyun Zhu

This study examines Chinese undergraduates' engagement in an asynchronous online cross-cultural peer review. Results from a mixed-method investigation showed no significant difference in the self-regulated learning actions between Chinese and Americans. Chinese also reported substantial benefits and generally positive emotions. Teacher and student interviews revealed structural factors promoting the engagement.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
G.6.1 Arabic EFL Students' Academic Writing: When Perception is not Reality (Paper)
Peter Parker

This paper investigates Arabic EFL writers' perception of their writing errors contrasted with the sentential and organizational errors produced in their academic papers. Findings reveal several disparities across students' actual writing errors and their perception. In light of the findings, implications for teaching Arabic EFL writers are discussed.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:20 PM-1:50 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
G.6.2 Impact of Subject Positioning on the Coherence of Chinese Students' EFL Writing (Paper)
Bufeng Song, Junju Wang

Research shows that a writer chooses from a range of "subject positions" in an actual writing task. This study explores at what subject positions Chinese EFL students write and how these subject positions influence the coherence of their writing. This study contributes to EFL writing in Chinese context.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:50 PM-2:20 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
G.6.3 Monolingual writing support with bilingual benefits: The majority language as aide-de-camp for the heritage language (Paper)
Nicole Marx

Writing competencies have been shown to correlate in different languages. The present study examined a possible causal relationship by carrying out a majority-language writing intervention and examining the effects on text quality in both this language and the heritage language of bilingual students.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
G.7.1 "Linguistic disadvantage" in writing for publishing: An alternative lens (Paper)
Fang Xu

In discussions of "linguistic disadvantage" in writing for publishing, neither of existing views of language seems to have addressed multilingual novice writers' dual needs of language acquisition and writing development. I propose a lens that underscores development of complex genre awareness in the acquisition of formulaic sequences in academic discourse.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:20 PM-1:50 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
G.7.2 Chinese university faculty's language choice and motivation for publishing in English and Chinese (Paper)
Jun Lei, Tianmin Jiang

This study investigates Chinese university faculty's language choice and motivation for publishing in English and Chinese, and the influence of disciplinary background and overseas experience thereon. It reveals clear language-, discipline-, and overseas experience-based differences and complex interactions among them in their language choice and motivation for publishing.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:50 PM-2:20 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
G.7.3 Cross-Cultural Variations in Saudi and International Journals of Applied Linguistics: The Move–Bundle Connection Approach (Paper)
Basim Alamri

Based on the Move–Bundle Connection Approach, this study investigates the rhetorical structure and lexical bundles in applied linguistics journals published in Saudi Arabia and internationally. Cross-cultural similarities and variances between both corpora and important implications for genre-based instruction will be discussed in the light of English as Lingua Franca.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
G.8.1 Integrated technology pedagogy and content knowledge: A framework for multi-plurilingual learning enhancement (Paper)
Sojung Lee, Daniel Dusza

Preparing students to work with technology in cultural complexity requires considerable effort, skill, and time to implement. The introduction of technology often leaves other language learning opportunities poorly attended. A framework of integrating the disciplines of culture, education, and language with the diverse opportunities available through technology will be discussed.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:50 PM-1:20 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
G.9.1 Negotiating English Across Transnational Contexts: Multilingual Literacies of Bhutanese Refugees in the U.S. (Paper)
Tika Lamsal

By exploring tensions between dominant monolingualist views in the recent immigrants' notions about culture/language and traditions, and their actual engagement in multilingual and multicultural literacies, this presentation argues that refugees and new immigrants construct their language identity by engaging in fluid, shifting, situated, and emergent literacy practices across transnational contexts.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:20 PM-1:50 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
G.9.2 Tensions of multilingual practices: Pre-college ESL students' navigating academic literacies in an intensive English program (Paper)
Soyeon Lee

In the era of globalization, educators have argued for a multilingual approach that values L2 students' linguistic resources. However, little scholarship has attended to tensions that students often experience due to the continuing monolingual ideologies. This presentation illuminates how pre-college L2 students experience these impasses in an Intensive English Program.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:50 PM-2:20 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
G.9.3 Identities in the making: An autoethnography of graduate students entering the field of L2 writing (Paper)
Tanita Saenkhum, Joseph Wilson, Hannah Soblo

This presentation discusses the results of a two-year autoethnography of graduate students on the process of identity construction as new L2 writing specialists, and argues that understanding how graduate students construct professional identities is of great importance for both research and teaching in the field of L2 writing.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:20 PM-2:45 PM
Coffee Break

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
H.1.1 Criteria for getting published in top tier journals (Paper)
Dana Ferris, Icy Lee

In this 50 minute session, the 4 editors of JSLW will discuss the most important criteria for getting published in top tier journals and provide an opportunity for questions and discussion in the final 10 minutes.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
H.2.1 Indigenizing the Writing Class: Elder-guided pedagogies to foster intercultural competence (Paper)
Christina Grant, Lucie Moussu

Indigenous worldviews and pedagogies have been under-explored as ways to foster intercultural competence through inclusive, safe, holistic, intensively relational spaces in the socio-culturally diverse writing classroom. I will share my experiences in integrating indigenous approaches that consider students' physical, emotional, spiritual, and mental dimensions in a first-year writing studies course.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
H.2.2 A Proposition to Promote Multilingual Writing Pedagogy in First-year Composition (Paper)
Gul Nahar

Reflecting critically on the institutional norm of dominant English language policy upon the assessment of multilingual writing, this qualitative study aims to understand and gain a perspective whether pedagogical philosophies can be reified to empower multilingual students to become powerful writers by acknowledging and nurturing their agency and writerly identity.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
H.2.3 "I just temporarily accept": Exploring a Graduate Multilingual Writer's Delayed Resistance to a Peer Tutor's Advice (Paper)
Kristina Lewis

A microethnographic examination of an advice-giving interaction—and the tutee's later rejection of that advice—in a graduate peer tutoring session. Both the tutor and tutee's interpretation of the interaction as well as the missed opportunity for valuable negotiation will be analyzed. Implications for tutoring multilingual writers will be discussed.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
H.3.1 A mixed methods study of L2 writing specialist identity across disciplinary contexts (Paper)
Joseph Wilson

This presentation offers a framework for analyzing L2 writing specialist identity by presenting the results of an international survey as well individual interviews. The presenter specifically examines individual discursive practices, formations, and socio-politics to address the ongoing debates about the direction and axiology of the field as a whole.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
H.3.2 An analysis of racial self-identification in the discourses of L2 writing specialists (Paper)
Allison Nicole Harris, Joseph Wilson

Our presentation posits that racial subject positioning impacts that the ways that L2 writing specialists engage in professional and disciplinary discourse. By presenting the results of 10 in-depth interviews, we argue that L2 writing must account for colonial modes of classificatory divisions for both teachers and students.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
H.3.3 Delayed self-correction and focus-on-form in written corrective feedback (WCF) (Paper)
María-Elena Solares-Altamirano

The striking focus-on-form, resulting from delayed self-correction in this study, might help researchers understand the non-lineal nature of the writing process that many studies have turned into a linear (pre-writing, composing, post-writing) one. This study advocates the need for a time span between different stages of the writing process.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
H.4.1 Three-Way Corrective Feedback in EFL Writing at a Junior College in Japan (Paper)
Kaoru Mita, Yoshie Kubota, Lorna Velia De Vera

This presentation explores how three-way corrective feedback (automated writing evaluation software, native teachers, outsourced correction) affects students' writing at a junior college in Japan. The results showed that high proficiency students used immediate indirect feedback efficiently, and non-native teachers' writing instruction may have had a significant impact on students' fluency.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
H.4.2 Functions and Features of Peer Review Activities: A Case Study of a Chinese College EFL Writing Class (Paper)
Ju Zhan, Wei Li, Haiying Pan

The present study investigated peer review activities in a college EFL writing class in China, focusing on the scaffolding functions, features of the students' interactive feedback and their attitudes to peer review. The findings provide implication of using peer review in L2 writing instruction in China and other EFL contexts.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
H.4.3 Second language writers withdraw their participation in peer-review (Paper)
Cynthia Lin

A multiple cases study explored five second language writers' learning experiences in a First-Year Writing class. This presentation addresses how they changed their participation in in-class peer-review when the semester was progressing and suggests how to design peer-review in support of student writing.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
H.5.1 Using written corrective feedback effectively: Developing instructional strategies (Paper)
Britney Paris

Written Corrective Feedback (WCF) is a common formative assessment strategy; however, learners do not use this feedback effectively. I will discuss the findings of a study of the influence of learner proficiency on affective responses to feedback and propose a future study to further support learners in effectively using WCF.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
H.5.2 Cognitive processing of peer feedback in a graduate-level EAP course: A multiple-case study (Paper)
Ye Han

The multiple-case study involving three Chinese graduate students in an EAP course investigated learner cognitive processing of peer feedback. Preliminary findings revealed cross-case similarities regarding the participants' criticality as feedback users, as well as great individual variations in their depth of processing and their use of metacognitive and cognitive strategies.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
H.5.3 Constructing a Third Space: Two Western-Educated Teachers' Professional Legitimacy in EFL Writing Classrooms (Paper)
Rae Lin

This qualitative interview study adopts Homi Bhabha's (1994) concept of third space to explore professional legitimacy of two Western-educated teachers and their teaching English writing in Taiwanese universities.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
H.6.1 Genre knowledge and genre awareness in multilingual writing:  Disentangling a theoretical and methodological web (Paper)
Bruna Sommer Farias, Christine Tardy

This study examines the theoretical terms of genre knowledge and genre awareness to propose a framework that operationalizes these constructs in multilingual writing research. We illustrate the framework through study of a Portuguese-for-multilingual-writers' classroom, and we discuss the frameworks' strengths and limitations for multilingual genre learning.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
H.6.2 EFL students' learning of writing from a multimodal design perspective (Paper)
Ming-i Lydia Tseng

This presentation reports an in-depth qualitative study which aims to investigate how a group of Taiwanese EFL students engage in the processes of "transitioning from digital to non-digital genres" (Belcher, 2017, p.83) by working on cooperative multimodal projects and individual writing tasks for learning to write academic genres in English.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
H.6.3 Iranian EFL students' affective engagement with WCF: Impact of L1 student identities (Paper)
Hooman Saeli

This presentation reports on the findings of a qualitative study on Iranian EFL students' L2 learner identities and how those identities are affected by their L1 counterparts. Also, it is discussed that such an effect could lead to students' negative affective engagement with written corrective feedback.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
H.7.1 Writing for scholarly publication in English: Perceptions of Vietnamese authors (Paper)
Yen Hoang

This paper reports a qualitative interview-based study which examines Vietnamese authors' perceptions of writing for scholarly publication in English and their perceived advantages and problems/difficulties as a result of their choice of publishing in English as an Additional Language.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
H.7.2 From Student to Scholar: Making the Leap to Writing for Publication in Applied Linguistics (Paper)
Elena Shvidko, Dwight Atkinson

The study examined how early-career academics navigated their transition from being graduate students to becoming publishing writers, and what kinds of experiences influenced this process. The authors discuss the factors that affected participants' publishing endeavors and offer implications for graduate students and educators.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Westcoast Energy Executive Meeting Room (2250)
H.7.3 Research interests in L2 writing: A retrospective of JSLW's first 25 years (Paper)
Paul Stapleton

A survey of the Journal of Second Language Writing's 348 full-length articles in it first 25 years was conducted. Categories in two tiers were generated via a coding process. Trends and patterns both within the journal and the L2 writing field at large will be discussed.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
H.8.1 What is adaptive about adaptive transfer: Understanding how adaptive transfer of writing occurs (Paper)
Nawwaf Alhazmi

This presentation reports findings of a study that empirically examined the notion of adaptive transfer of writing. Findings suggest that adaptation of writing knowledge occurs as students interrogate their previous writing knowledge as they make sense of the new writing situation. Implications for L2 writing research and teaching are discussed.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
H.8.2 Effects of the Second Language on the First Language: Tracing Possible Backward Transfer in Chinese EFL Learners' Written Texts (Paper)
Yan Yang, Lawrence Zhang

The present study investigates the effects of the second language (English) on the first language (Chinese) in an environment where English as a foreign language is learned through instruction in a classroom setting. A mixed methods design is adopted to explore the cross-linguistic influence in Chinese EFL learners' written texts.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, McCarthy Tetrault Lecture Room (2245)
H.8.3 A comparative study of writing for scholarly publication in the Chinese and Iranian contexts (Paper)
Yanning Dong, Ismaeil Fazel, Ling Shi

In this study, we collected data from researchers in China (n=312) and Iran (n=304) to explore their experiences of publishing research in English-medium journals. We also interviewed 23 and 50 Chinese and Iranian researchers respectively. After providing the comparative findings, we offer suggestions for supporting multilingual writers' writing for publication.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
H.9.1 The sociocultural side of the translingual coin: Chinese L2 writers' topic selection and writing performance (Paper)
Rebeca Fernandez, Shireen Campbell, Kyo Koo

Our presentation challenges underemphasis of institutional context and socio-cultural repertoires in translanguaging discussions. In our longitudinal study of Chinese L2 writers, evidence of code-meshing or L1 use was rare, but students exhibited agency and improved performance when they chose to write about topics most familiar and meaningful to them.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
H.9.2 Resource, pressure, problem: The paradox of plurilingual resources in writing postgraduate dissertations (Paper)
Diane Potts, Mengqi Xu

Drawing on a case study of the interactional dynamics between dissertation supervisors and international MA students, this paper examines when, what and how students' plurilingual resources contributed to students' dissertations. Data suggests challenges and benefits of translanguaging were overshadowed by pressures to use English. Implications for future research are discussed.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, RBC Dominion Securities Executive Meeting Room (2200)
H.9.3 The (Meta)Functions of Paraphrasing: Pedagogical supports using SFL in EAP (Paper)
Jennifer Walsh Marr

This focus of this presentation is to bridge advances in the critical literature around paraphrasing for developing L2 writers to pedagogical praxis through a functional lens.  I draw from tasks custom developed for first year Arts students with embedded discipline-specific language support.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 4:15 PM-4:30 PM
Break

Friday, August 3, 2018, 4:30 PM-5:30 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
Plenary III Writing in English as an additional language across the disciplines in higher education: Challenges, dilemmas, and plurilingual pedagogy (Plenary)
Steve Marshall

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:15 AM-9:45 AM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
I.1 Scaffolding and assessing disciplinary writing through collaborations between language and disciplinary specialists in multilingual contexts (Colloquium)
Silvia Pessoa, Thomas D. Mitchell, Maria Pia Gomez Laich, Ryan T. Miller, Sandra Zappa-Hollman

This colloquium reports on SFL-based collaborations between applied linguists and faculty in the disciplines of history, information systems, sciences, engineering and social sciences to scaffold the writing and assessment of multiple academic genres. We provide recommendations for effective collaboration with disciplinary faculty to scaffold, assess, and document student writing development.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
I.2.1 Effects and preferences for using corpus tools for correcting errors (Paper)
Ying-Hsueh Cheng, Hui-Hsien Feng

This study investigated how 21 Taiwanese upper intermediate-level English majors used a set of corpus tools for solving linguistic problems while revising multiple essay assignments in English. Findings showed that corpus data is useful for revising lexical and grammatical errors after students received coded error feedback from the instructor.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
I.2.2 A Mixed-Methods Investigation into Japanese EFL Learners' Online Revision Activities During the Reading-into-Writing Task Completion Process (Paper)
Yutaka Ishii, Yasuyo Sawaki

This study investigated Japanese EFL learners' online revision activities while completing a reading-into-writing task by combining keystroke logging and stimulated recall. The results showed various online revision activities reported in previous studies as well as those that are unique to integrated writing performance of learners in the EFL context.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
I.2.3 A Contrastive Study of Recurrent Word Combinations in the Same Topic Compositions by Chinese and American College Students (Paper)
Juanjuan Wang, ChengXian Tang

Within the frame work of contrastive interlanguage analysis, this study aims to contrast the usage of multiword combination in the same topic compositions of American and Chinese college students based on a corpus driven structural and functional analysis.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
I.3.1 Meaningful Collaboration: Scaffolding Multilingual Writers in Group Writing Conferences (Paper)
Jennifer Ritter

Group writing conferences provide alternate approaches to peer-review and student-teacher conferences. This action research examines how group conferences allow first-year multilingual writers in an English-dominant institution to engage in effective feedback and purposeful problem solving to support the development of writing and of writers.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
I.3.3 A move analysis of life science papers to develop an editing tool for EFL graduate students (Paper)
Miho Yamashita

Graduate students in science departments in Japan have difficulty writing research papers. In an aim to help students write their papers, an editing tool has been developed based on Move Analysis for science papers. The details of the analysis, development, and the new findings will be described in this presentation.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
I.4.1 Bringing innovation to EFL writing through the integration of critical thinking: An ecological approach (Paper)
Min Zou

Drawing on multiple sources of data collected from one EFL writing classroom, the study uncovers the actual process and outcome of one EFL writing teacher's attempts to integrate critical thinking in writing instruction and concludes with pedagogical implications to maximize the potential of integrating critical thinking in EFL writing classrooms.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
I.4.2 Substrates in sociocognitive alignment of the second language writing process (Paper)
Yachao Sun, Ge Lan

This study investigates how substrates-semiotic resources distilled from social interaction (Goodwin, 2013)-are engaged in sociocognitive alignment of the SLW process. The findings show that substrates function more in planning and revising while the reuse of substrates exert more influence in drafting, which corroborate the theoretical and methodological understanding of SLW.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
I.4.3 Project-based bilingual activity for EFL writing and Fukushima revitalization (Paper)
Takako Yasuta

This study introduces a bilingual writing project for the revitalization of a disaster-hit community. The participants worked on a comic-based writing activity in Japanese and then in English. It was found that using L1 in the writing activity helped the participants to express and organize their ideas better in English.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
I.5.1 The Missing Subject in the Second Language Writing for Chinese-speaking Graduate Students: Sentential to Cultural Concern in a Translative Composing Process (Paper)
Jie-Wei Jiang

This study explores the difficulties Chinese-speaking graduate students may encounter in switching between their Chinese-based rhetoric and an English-oriented fashion of reasoning. Specifically, students' command of the subject in the shaping of sentences offers an insight both into a cultural rhetoric and a translation-built mechanism behind their composing process.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:45 AM-9:15 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
I.5.2 Understanding Chinese International Students' L2 Writing Experiences in A Private American High School (Paper)
Yanan Zhao

This multiple-case study explores a group of Chinese international students' academic writing experiences in an American high school. It focuses on how these students comprehend and complete various writing tasks assigned in their sophomore year classrooms. Findings identified these students' challenges and coping strategies as they completed writing assignments.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
I.5.3 ESL students' digital writing and interactions in a social bookmarking tool (Paper)
Oksana Vorobel, Deniz Gokcora, Tuvi Voorhees

This multiple-case study investigates English as a second language (ESL) students' digital writing and interactions in a social bookmarking tool from an ecological perspective. It then discusses patterns and changes in the participants' digital writing (summarizing in initial posts and nature of comments), information sharing, and collaboration in digital media.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:15 AM-8:45 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
I.6.1 Assessment for Teaching and Learning in ESL Writing (Paper)
Ling He

Dynamic assessment calls for reflections on the existent practice. This study explores practical dimensions of assessment though scoring rubrics in teaching ESL writing at a U.S. college. The findings show the positive washback of assessment in the scaffolding of teaching and learning in ESL writing.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 9:15 AM-9:45 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
I.6.3 Teaching L2 students how to make rhizome connections during the brainstorming process (Paper)
Rebecca Maldonado

Many L2 students lack the ability to make connections in their writing, resulting in choppy, unconnected papers. In this interactive workshop, you will learn how to apply Deleuze and Guattari's rhizome theory to the brainstorming process to show students connections between their ideas and languages, resulting in fluid papers.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 9:45 AM-10:10 AM
Coffee Break

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:10 AM-11:40 AM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
J.1 EFL writing instruction and teacher preparation in under-represented contexts (Colloquium)
Sarah Henderson Lee, Shyam Pandey, Estela Ene, Tanita Saenkhum, Lisya Seloni, Nur Yigitoglu, Şebnem Yalçın, Aylin Unaldi

Panelists examine English writing instruction and teacher training in four under-represented EFL contexts: Nepal, Romania, Thailand, and Turkey. Interviews, surveys, and analyses of teaching materials/classroom practices reveal the needs of EFL writing teachers and the factors that influence their development. Similarities, differences, and implications are considered.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
J.2.2 Writing center tutoring activity: Different motives, different experiences (Paper)
Mayumi Fujioka

This study reports on two contrasting cases of L2 English writing tutors, who engaged in different activities while tutoring. One tutor emphasized tutoring as counseling, while the other benefited from gaining new knowledge through comradeship with writers. Their differing views came from their previous and ongoing educational experiences.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
J.2.3 Metacognitive and cognitive perspectives on written-feedback and directed-revision foci in L2 Writing (Paper)
Lawrence Jun Zhang

L1 and L2 writing both involve revision, which is as important a metacognitive endeavor as is a cognitive process. We report findings from a large-scale study into the effects of revision-focus direction on L2 students' revision of texts at different times and the differential effects on text quality.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
J.3.1 Second language writers' construction of emotional voice in poetry writing (Paper)
Atsushi Iida

Poetry writing is viewed as an effective second language (L2) literacy practice, but very little research has discussed how L2 writers' voice is constructed and expressed in the text. This presentation addresses this issue by exploring lexical patterns of emotional voice construction in L2 poetry writing.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
J.3.2 The 'dual motives' of written assignments in an MEd programme (Paper)
Yongyan Li, Guangwei Hu

In a postgraduate professional development (PPD) programme, writing occurs at the juncture of academia and the professional world. We report a study that investigates how this is manifested at conceptual and textual levels, using a dataset comprised of interviews, assignment prompts, and student assignment papers.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
J.3.3 Exploring voice construction in second language writing and computer science journal articles (Paper)
Weiyu Zhang, Yin Ling Cheung

This study examined voice from the perspective of interpersonal meaning in the fields of computer networks and communications and second language writing. Using APPRAISAL theory, the study investigates how research writers use ENGAGEMENT resources to position themselves for propositions being referenced in their writing while taking putative readers into consideration.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
J.4.1 The medical world is a multilingual world mediated by English: Teaching students how to write their very first paper in a very short time (Paper)
Takahiko Yamamori

Japanese medical students, by the time they finish university, are expected to have profession-specific English writing skills in order to write medical papers and prepare for oral presentations in conferences. This case study considers the obstacles these students must overcome to learn to prepare papers in a very short time.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
J.4.2 Teaching Academic Integrity: The Impact of an EAP Program on Students' L2 Writing (Paper)
Bruce Russell, James Corcoran

This presentation outlines findings from a mixed methods study aimed at ascertaining the impact of a year-long EAP program on students' awareness of academic integrity (AI). This session provides suggestions for AI pedagogy and will be of interest to those involved in supporting plurilingual undergraduate students' academic writing.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
J.4.3 The impact of critical thinking and drafting strategies on Japanese L2 academic writing (Paper)
Zeinab Shekarabi

In this study, the effect of the combination of outlining and free-writing strategies with different levels of critical thinking skill on JSL argumentative essays will be considered. Results concerning the impact of these elements on the quality of L2 academic writing and the instruction of academic writing will be discussed.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
J.5.1 Understanding Chinese university students' emotional responses towards teacher written corrective feedback in L2 writing (Paper)
Yao Zheng, Shulin Yu

Drawing upon data elicited by students' think-aloud sessions and interviews, drafts of essays, and teacher WCF, this study investigates the emotional responses of Chinese university students towards WCF and their subsequent revisions. The findings suggest that students' emotions could play an important role in their uptake of WCF.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
J.5.2 Challenges of L2 writers in read-to-write pedagogical and assessment tasks (Paper)
Heike Neumann, Sarah Leu, Kim McDonough

What challenges do students face as they learn how to integrate information appropriately in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) classrooms? In this exploratory mixed-methods study, we collected and analyzed students' source-based writing exams and conducted student and instructor interviews. The findings and their pedagogical implications will be discussed.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
J.5.3 Cultivating Intercultural Competence through Paired Freshman Composition Sections: Theory, Pedagogy and Assessment (Paper)
Hadi Banat, Parva Panahi, Phuong Tran, Rebekah Sims

Employing culturally relevant pedagogies and designing writing curricula which develop intercultural competence are germane to institutions that have diverse student populations. This presentation focuses on the research, curricular, and pedagogical components of a course design linking freshman composition classes of domestic and international students. Implications for classroom practices are provided.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:10 AM-10:40 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
J.6.1 Interrogating theory in second language writing teaching and research (Paper)
Kai Yang

This study investigates issues on theory in second language (L2) writing teaching and research by synthesizing related studies in both L2 writing and its feeder disciplines. This study discusses the nature of theory in L2 writing, its hierarchical structure, and its relation to practice.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:40 AM-11:10 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
J.6.2 Adoption and adaptation: Localization of the sequenced writing approach in academic writing teaching (Paper)
Cong Zhang, Junju Wang, Qiuyan Yan

The authors will present how they adopted and adapted the sequenced writing approach from a US university and localize it in a Chinese university. Two rounds of teaching experiments and the effectiveness will be reported; theories guiding the course design will be pinpointed; and reflections and implications will be provided.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 11:10 AM-11:40 AM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
J.6.3 Analyzing a multilingual graduate writer's multi-drafting processes in a collaborative writing project (Paper)
Junghwa Kim

This study aims to provide an analysis of a multilingual graduate writer's multi-drafting processes in a context of a collaborative research project. Drawing on Activity Theory (Engestrom, 1996), this qualitative research focuses on examining diverse feedback activities in the collaboration and its impacts on the writing processes.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 11:40 AM-12:40 PM
Lunch Break

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 12:40 PM-1:40 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
Plenary IV A testing time for testing L2 writing: A proposal for a construct redefinition (Plenary)
Guangwei Hu

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 1:40 PM-1:45 PM
Break

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 1:45 PM-2:15 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
K.2.1 What membership categorization analysis tells us about student peer review (Paper)
John Bankier

Membership categorization analysis (Sacks, 1992) was used to analyze data from a year-long ethnographic study of seven Japanese learners on an academic English program at a Japanese university. Semi-structured interviews discussing multilingual written peer feedback on assignment drafts showed how peer review is influenced by power and social relations.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:15 PM-2:45 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
K.2.2 Three Approaches to Strengthen Multilingual Writers' Lexical Resource in Academic Writing Tasks (Paper)
Alison Youngblood, Melanie Gonzalez

A strong lexical resource enables multilingual writers to choose precise and accurate words. However, developing a lexical resource in a second language involves more than increasing vocabulary size.  This presentation offers three categories of resources, activities, and editing tools  second language writing instructors can use to strengthen students' lexical resource.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
K.2.3 "Talk about what you write": Exploring the interplay of oral and written modality in EFL writing (Paper)
Yu-Shan Fan

This study argues the role of multimodality of language as an instructional strategy to foster L2 writing process and written products. While the integration of oral modality into L2 writing is observed to enhance the learning to write process, L2 proficiency levels may influence the effectiveness of this instructional strategy.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 1:45 PM-2:15 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
K.3.1 The Mirror, the Canvas, and the In-Between: Mobilizing Self-Narratives and Third Places among Heritage Chinese Students (Paper)
Charissa Che

This presentation addresses the potential of self-narratives and "third places" to center heritage Chinese students' voices on their own acculturative experiences, and cultivate a more inclusive writing classroom culture. A study employs ethnographic and autoethnographic approaches to question what makes for "good" writing and foster cross-cultural learning within SLW.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:15 PM-2:45 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
K.3.2 The dialogicality of voice in thesis writing and group writing conferences: Looking at voice through an activity systems lens (Paper)
Naoko Mochizuki, Sue Starfield

The presentation explores the process of dialogicality of voice in educational settings, where different voices interacting with individuals' voice construction. Adopting activity systems analysis, the study investigated the interrelationships between multiple voices, namely those of readers and writers writing a PhD thesis as they interacted in group writing conferences.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
K.3.3 Translingualism revisited: Language difference and hybridity across speech and writing (Paper)
Jeroen Gevers

This presentation assesses the translingual teaching paradigm, focusing on the use of oral patterns by students. Given the different demands of speech and writing, the presenter argues for the need to consider if multilingual students wish to negotiate translingual identities as writers and how doing so might benefit them.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:15 PM-2:45 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
K.4.2 Analyzing Academic Writing Policies in Higher Education (Paper)
Hilda Hidalgo Aviles

I investigate how context influences academic literacy practices. I discuss how dominant discourses dominate and influence local practices namely the reading and writing of undergraduate students in two disciplines.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
K.4.3 Embracing Difference:  Re-examining Composing Processes (Paper)
Deirdre Vinyard

Based on the results of focus groups conducted with multilingual writers, the presenter will argue for the need for teachers and tutors to push for a deeper understanding of the composing processes of multilingual students, using the lenses of linguistic multicompetence (Cook) and translingual practice (Canagarajah).,

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 1:45 PM-2:15 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
K.5.1 Developing English across the Curriculum for L2 learners in a complex linguistics environment (Paper)
Julia Chen

This presentation describes and reports evaluation results for a cross-institution English Across the Curriculum initiative designed to engage faculty in the support of ESL students' disciplinary writing in the translanguaging context of Hong Kong where most students talk and think in Chinese but the medium of instruction is English.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:15 PM-2:45 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
K.5.2 Introducing an interdisciplinary framework for designing L2 online writing courses (Paper)
Tanya Tercero

The presenter shares her interdisciplinary framework for designing, teaching, assessing and improving Online Writing Courses for multilingual writers. This framework is based on the work of the CCCCs, the Quality Matters™ rubric for evaluating online courses, L2 writing theory and pedagogy, and L2 writers' perceptions of their online courses.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
K.5.3 Composing English Digital Storytelling for the Global (Paper)
Yu-Feng (Diana) Yang

Grounded in "literacy as social practice," and the notion of "designing," (The New London Group, 1996), this research investigates how second language writers serve as multimodal designers and carry out intercultural blending (i.e., remix local and global cultural resources) in one type of multimodal compositions, English digital storytelling.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 1:45 PM-2:15 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
K.6.1 Mastering L2 writing for Statistics and Data Science: Tasks and challenges (Paper)
Natalia Dolgova

This presentation addresses the development of genre features in L2 writing of graduate EAP students of Statistics and Data Science. Students' first and final drafts of recommendation reports are analyzed using a mixed-methods approach; the findings reveal a number of challenges students face in the genre acquisition process.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:15 PM-2:45 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
K.6.2 Investigating the Development of Academic Literacies, Writing, and Identities in L2 University Students (Paper)
Rachel LaMance

This project traces the academic literacy development of three international students at a US university. Focusing both on students' texts as well as the contexts of their production, I examine the evolution of students' identities and their writing processes as they navigate the US university context.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:45 PM-3:15 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
K.6.3 Improving Writing for Academic Purposes through the Use of Genre (Paper)
Asma Afreen

My presentation will review recent theoretical and empirical studies on the use of genre-based approach in academic writing instruction to illustrate how genre-pedagogy can support EAP students' academic writing. My presentation will highlight the concept of genre-pedagogy, its effectiveness in developing the academic writing of students, and its pedagogical implications.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM-3:45 PM
Coffee Break

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
L.1.1 Literacy of minority groups: The case of Romani people (Paper)
Mira Bekar

Research on integrated education shows that in elementary schools with high numbers of Romani students actions are rarely taken to enhance the integration of these minority group. This paper presents the social, financial, educational problems and the development of literacy competencies of Romani people.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:15 PM-4:45 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
L.1.2  

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
L.2.1 Plurality in English as a World Language (Paper)
Albert Latorella Lehner

Japanese university students in an English-medium global studies program that includes a period of study abroad enroll in a course about world Englishes before leaving Japan. They examine the globalization of English, particularly its impact within Japan. Students analyze, critique, and enhance their current understandings about and stances toward English.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:15 PM-4:45 PM, Cominco Policy Room (1415)
L.2.2 Developing a New Analytic Evaluation Criteria for Novice EFL Learners: A Pilot Study (Paper)
Chiaki Baba

A pilot version of analytic evaluation criteria – word count, vocabulary, grammar, and content – for novice EFL learners was developed. Based on these criteria, eight raters evaluated 30 samples written by novice EFL learners, and the reliability and the validity of the criteria were analyzed.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
L.3.1 Welcoming multilingual writers: A paradigm-shifting approach to training writing center tutors (Paper)
Jenny Thomas

Multilingual writers often receive the message—directly or indirectly—that they and their writing needs are troublesome in writing centers. This session will engage participants with a new tutor training module, discussing its application to their contexts with the goal of developing more sensitive, flexible, welcoming spaces for all writers.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:15 PM-4:45 PM, Barrick Gold Lecture Room (1520)
L.3.2 Argumentative Writing in English: Perceived Needs of Bilingual Writers (Paper)
Parva Panahi Lazarjani

In this presentation, I report on the results of a survey on bilingual writers' perceptions of their argumentation needs in academic writing in the context of a graduate degree program. The results show the participants need support with the development and presentation of arguments in a coherent manner.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
L.4.1 Colonial rhetorical constraints in Bangladeshi letter writing practices: A case for genre based critical writing pedagogy (Skype)
Md Mijanur Rahman

This presentation will theorize the letter writing practices in Bangladesh as colonial through a comparative genre analysis of Bangladeshi and U.S. school letters. The analysis will highlight the colonial rhetorical constraints affecting Bangladeshi letters and the need for genre based critical writing pedagogy to battle them.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:15 PM-4:45 PM, Canfor Policy Room (1600)
L.4.2 International Graduate Student Understandings and Struggles with Critical Thinking (Paper)
Kyle Lucas

Using a narrative-case study framework, this article examines international graduate student perceptions of and challenges with critical thinking. Four participants were interviewed, and the results showed that participants had diverse conceptions of critical thinking. Furthermore, educational differences between the U.S. and China were highlighted in the interviews.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
L.5.1 Writing conferences for L2 learning to write: A case study (Paper)
Junko Imai

This case study explored whether the engagement in writing conferences led a L2 learner to change her participation revision practices and how she and her tutor participated in the conferences discursively. Reporting findings from the coding and discourse analysis, it highlights the importance of conferencing in L2 learning to write.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:15 PM-4:45 PM, Scotiabank Lecture Room (1315)
L.5.2 Writing to Avoid Plagiarism: Computer-Mediated Source-Based Writing in a Pre-University EAP Program (Paper)
Gene Vasilopoulos

Drawing on in-depth interviews and screen-cast recordings collected over a two month period as students in an EAP composed a research paper, this presentation focuses on how three low-performing writers used digital tools, namely online bilingual dictionaries, google translate, and google search engine, to avoid plagiarism.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:45 PM-4:15 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
L.6.1 L2 writing and multilingual writers: Definition, limitation, and solution (Paper)
June Yichun Liu

Although the validity of distinguishing native and non-native English speakers has been questioned, and researchers have strived to redefine English learners' identities, no consensus has been reached. This study attempts to reexamine the traditional trichotomy of NES, ESL and EFL, and to redefine L2 writing from the perspectives Apply Linguistics.

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:15 PM-4:45 PM, Sauder Industries Policy Room (2270)
L.6.2 The use of formal and informal support systems by international students for L2 writing classes: A raciolinguistic analysis (Paper)
Sei Lee

This qualitative study will investigate how international students at a large, 4-year public university utilize informal and formal support systems to navigate a U.S. higher education climate shaped by Standard English language ideology (Flores & Rosa, 2015) and ideologies of cultural superiority (Liu & Tannacito, 2013).

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:45 PM-4:55 PM
Break

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:55 PM-5:30 PM, Segal Centre (1400-1430)
Closing and SSLW 2019 Preview

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